Ten Signs You’re Shooting Too Low In Your Job Search

 

Dear Liz,

 

I’ve been job-hunting since October. Maybe I was naive thinking my job search would be quick and easy. I’ve been in the insurance industry for over twenty years.

 

I’ve been an agent, an office manager and held almost every insurance job there is.

 

I’ve only had one in-person job interview so far. I’ve applied for numerous jobs but in the other cases I either got a phone interview or no interview.

 

They keep telling me I’m overqualified for the jobs I’m applying for. If I’m overqualified doesn’t that make me the perfect candidate, because I can obviously do the job?

 

I thought if I took my target position down a level or two from the last few jobs I’ve held, I would get hired much faster. I’m applying for jobs I performed fifteen years ago and I thought that would do the trick but it’s not working.

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I’m sick of job hunting. I would accept anything. I still have my savings and retirement accounts because I’ve been living frugally since October, but I’m tired of job-hunting and I want to be employed as fast as possible. What am I doing wrong?

 

 

Dear Harlan,

 

It sounds like you’re shooting too low in your job search, and that is almost always a show-stopper. Employers don’t want to hire people who could perform the job with one hand tied behind their back.

 

Here are some of the reasons why not:

 

  1. They are afraid you’ll quit for a better job the minute you have the opportunity to do so.

 

  1. They are afraid that even if you say “I’ll take this job, a lower-level role that pays less than I’ve earned since 2004 — no problem!” you won’t be happy. You’ll be antsy. They don’t need that.

 

  1. They want to hire someone they can train their own way.

 

  1. They get spooked by any candidate who seems to know more about the field than they do.

 

There could be an age-discrimination aspect depending on your age, but the key is that you are shooting too low and recruiters can tell that you’re doing so. They don’t want to hire somebody for whom this job is not a natural step along your career path.

 

How can we blame them for that? It’s fear that is making you shoot low in your job search and even though everyone can relate to that fear, the remedy for the fear is not to take any job you can get but to stop and think about what you do best and what you really want to do.

 

You have to do some reflection to figure out where your sweet spot lies — at the intersection of the things you do well, the things you love to do and the needs in the talent marketplace.

 

Your fearful mindset (“I still have my savings, but I’m sick of job-hunting and I want to be employed as fast as possible!”) is killing your job search.

 

People can read energy very well.

 

Fearful energy is not appealing in a senior-level candidate or any candidate. Your need to get hired fast is what’s artificially depressing your job-search altitude and keeping you from having the conversations you should be having with hiring managers in pain.

 

You have breathing room. You have your savings and retirement accounts. Take time to stop and figure out your next step. Give up the idea of getting any job at all. Employers want to hire somebody who is dying to do the job they’re hiring for — not somebody who’s merely willing to do the job because it represents a break from job-hunting.

 

Here are ten signs you’re shooting too low in your job search:

 

  1. Recruiters view your LinkedIn profile and say “Wow! You have lot of heavy-duty experience. Are you sure you’re interested in this much lower-level job?” They are skeptical. Do you think your hiring manager will be any less skeptical? Don’t use your precious mojo trying to talk anybody into interviewing you!

 

  1. When you show up for an interview or get on a call for a phone interview, the interviewer’s voice indicates surprise or puzzlement. They can’t match the person on the phone (you) with the job opening they’re ready to interview you for.

 

  1. Whenever you get a “no thanks” notice, it gushes about your vast experience and skills and closes with “….but we need someone with a background closer to the job spec.”

 

  1. Recruiters always express surprise that you’re willing to work for the salary number you give them. The gap between your expected salary target and your actual salary target is almost always a red flag for recruiters — whether you are asking for more or less money than the position pays.

 

  1. When you tell recruiters you’d be more than delighted to take a step down in your career they sound less than excited to hear it. Naturally they wonder “Why can’t this candidate get a job at their level?”

 

  1. On your job interviews, you answer every question with a precise, expert opinion on the spot. The interviewer is taken aback — maybe even intimidated. Most companies don’t hire people who intimidate their interviewers.

 

  1. You’ve heard at least one hiring manager say “Heck,you could do my job!” and they’re right.

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Five Job Search Moves That Make You Look Like An Amateur

 

Dear Liz,

 

I’m job-hunting. I have a few job possibilities I’m pursuing, but I’m only excited about one of them.

 

The best job opportunity I’ve found is with a company located about ten minutes from my house. It’s not only close to my house but the job is perfect for my background, too.

 

When I first talked to the recruiter on the phone she asked me what I was earning. I wasn’t working then so I said “I’m not working now but I’m looking for a job that pays at least $55,000.”

 

The recruiter said “Okay. I can work with that.”

 

When I interviewed with the employer (Company X) they asked me again “How much are you looking to earn?” I said “At least $55,000” and they said “Fine.”

 

Now I’ve met the hiring manager and several other employees. I have a much better feeling for the job. The recruiter called me last Friday and said “Okay, Company X is putting an offer together for you.

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3 Things You Can’t Control In Your Job Search (And 3 Things You Can!)

 

Several years ago, I interviewed for a job that I really, really wanted: It seemed like the perfect role at a dream organization. I worked hard to prepare for the interview, and though I was nervous on the big day, I felt ready.

 

I was at ease with the interviewers (a team of five!), and felt we developed a strong rapport. I left the office sure I’d made a good impression—only to find out a few days later that they hired someone else.

 

I was devastated and disappointed. But their rejection email emphasized it wasn’t that I was a bad fit, but rather that there was someone who was a better fit.

 

This was a critical lesson for me. When looking for a new position, you want to believe that it’ll be like buying a new computer or booking a trip. In other words, you’ll research all of the options, pick the best and it’ll be yours. The hard reality, however, is that there is so much outside of your control in a job search from what openings are out there, to who else is in the running, to whether your interviewer is having a bad day.

 

So, a much better way to spend your time and energy is to focus on the parts that are within your control. In these areas, greater effort will mean more payoff.

And, for everything outside of your control?

Admitting they’re out of your hands will keep you from taking a loss too personally.

Here’s a guide to what’s what:

 

  1. You Can’t Control Who’s Hiring

Sometimes, the exact position you’re looking for will open up at just the right time; and other times you feel like you’ve been refreshing job boards and checking back in with your contacts again (and again, and again) before you see anything that’s a good fit. Unfortunately, you can’t will a role into being available.

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The new year is on top of us.

You have a decision to make: are you going to keep your job for another year, or strike out for greener pastures in 2018?

 

Now is the perfect time to ask, “Does my job still deserve me?”

Keep in mind that our tendency as human beings is to stick with the tried-and-true and avoid the unfamiliar. Changing jobs is a pain in the neck. It’s easier to stick with the job you already have than to job-hunt, whether your current job is the right job for you or not.

It’s easy to go to sleep on your career, and forget that if you’re not moving ahead you are slipping backwards. It’s easy to start thinking that work is just a place to pick up a paycheck.

Your work is your art. You deserve to work for people who appreciate that fact — and appreciate the spark and brilliance you bring to everything you do.

You have talents you should be recognized and compensated for.

You have dreams and aspirations that only you can bring about. If your current job, your current boss or your current income level are keeping you from realizing your dreams, why stay stuck in place for another year?

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Three Ways You’re Killing Your Job Search Without Even Realizing It

Being in active job search mode often means you feel compelled to do something: post your resume online, apply for as many jobs as you can and network with contacts old and new.

However, there is a wide gap between activity and productivity. When the activity is actually not moving you forward into phone screens, in-person interviews and offers, then it’s time to stop and re-examine your approach.

The reality is that the precise things you think you should be doing are the exact strategies that are killing your search.

Posting your resume all over the internet simply means you are devoting time to an activity with little to no return. Applying for as many jobs as you can means you don’t have focus and smell like desperation. And when your networking is not working, that doesn’t mean you should repeat it, just expand it.

Here’s what smart candidates do to stop spinning their wheels and actually make progress:

Stop being the needle in the haystack.

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QA Manager – Compliance

Location
Cleveland, OH
Salary
$100,000 – $140,000
 
Degree
Bachelor
Date
Aug 24, 2016
 

Job Description

Responsible for supervising the activities of MQA Specialists. Ensures accurate and timely certification of manufacturing batch record documentation. Ensures performance of audits and SOP/GMP compliance at the manufacturing facility. Performs investigations as required to ensure product quality. Performs analysis on quality indicating data and makes recommendations for improvement.

Key Responsibilities

  • Supervises daily activities of MQA Specialists. Assures job objectives are met on a timely basis
  • Updates and procures approval of job descriptions for department personnel.
    Performs and oversees the training of personnel. Effectively hires,
    develops, councils, manages and motivates staff. Writes and administers
    performance appraisals for department personnel.
  • Assures standard operating procedures (SOPs) define the steps necessary to complete tasks. Writes review and updates SOPs.
  • Assures timely execution of batch record certification function. Follow up with
    department management to ensure corrective action is implemented.
  • Supports metrics for the facility. Collects, maintains, trends, and analyzes data.
  • Develops systems to facilitate timely finished product disposition. Perform
    investigations as required. Follows up to ensure corrective action as
    implemented. Initiates/supports management meetings/projects to
    facilitate timely product disposition.
  • Addresses daily quality concerns and questions. Offers recommendations as required. Performs investigations as necessary.
  • Troubleshoots manufacturing problems and quality issues. Works with operations
    personnel to investigate, collect, and analyze data for, resolve and
    implement corrective action. Contacts supplier and/or outside laboratory
    for investigational support.
  • Maintains knowledge of current GMPs and regulatory guidelines.
  • Performs supplemental investigations and determines impact or product disposition

 

Qualifications

APPLY

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Continuous Improvement Manager 

Job Code  (02380342) 

Location: Clarksville, IN  

Salary: $100,000.00 – $120,000.00

Full Benefits: Yes

Interview Exp: Yes

Relo Exp: Yes

 Industries

AUTOMOTV

  newjob

 

Job Description

 

Company:

Our customer is one of the world’s leading manufacturer of automotive components. This world class firm designs, develops and manufactures a broad range of products for both the OEM and aftermarket segments. This company is offering great compensation, benefits packages and substantial future career growth.

 diversity

 

Continuous Improvement Manager Summary:

APPLY:

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NURSE QAULITY MANAGER

newjobs

Outstanding opportunity with an exceptional organization providing caring and compassionate hospice and home health services to patients and families in California.
Compensation packages are open and negotiable based on experience, highly negotiable base (range is merely a rough guide), plus bonus opportunities and exceptional benefits offered.  Relocation assistance provided on a case-by-case basis.

diversity

Registered Nurse Educator/Quality Management-Home Health

Provide education on the McKesson application, create application procedure manuals, assure that manuals are updated as necessary, perform McKesson testing, and develop education materials.

 

Learn More

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OBSERVING THE ANNIVERSARY OF STUDIES IN ROMANTICISM unique concern, ” Contemplating Politics, Keats,” revisits the main topic of a set that appeared midway to the logis record. Printed in Summer 1986 beneath the guest-editorship of Wolfson, ” Politics and Keats ” added two phrases that seemed to present a conjunction that was impossible together. Wolfson noticed in the introduction “the overall essential habit” in those days “to consider AB muscles combination of’Keats’ and’politics’ as anything of a conceit.” (1) Based On long-placed assumptions concerning the romance between literature and politics, Keats were the pre-eminently apolitical if not anti-governmental Intimate poet, the dreamer who evaded external concerns and whose well-wrought shows aspired into a region of classic splendor.

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I’ve needed to rank a number of composition papers in the sessions I’ve coached, and I’ve diagnosed some might have plagiarized but I never truly pursued check into them as it would be too frustrating to test their resources and pursue any/all probable options where they might have ripped from. What is the simplest way to test for plagiarism? Will there be a tool that you could utilize to add a paper and look for it? Other than that, Idonot know of any other method to check for it than to put in more effort than I have time for, although I doubt it.

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