VP of HR

Job Code (02622235)

Location:Houston, TX

Salary:    $130,000.00 – $150,000.00

Full Benefits:  Yes

Comp Comments:  + bonus 10%

Industries: Multi-Site Distribution, Manufacturing, Job-Shop,

 

Must have 500 or more FTE’s with dominate hourly employees

 

Job Description

This is a highly respected leader in their industry that has a 100-year-old history.   They are experiencing a record sales year and have a very bright future.

 

The company is seeking out a strong VP level candidate with the following skills and experience:

Oversight of 3 US manufacturing locations and the HR staff at each location (50% travel required)

Work with and collaborate with 1 union facility

Broad background and experience in all aspects of HR

 

 

Essential Duties and Responsibilities:

  • Planning, designing, developing, and evaluating human resources policies and procedures that are in line with corporate objectives.
  • Manages all processes/policies relating to day-to-day human resources operations and compliance
  • Identify and implement corporate culture improvement imitative
  • Employee Development and Coaching
  • Compensation Planning including base salary, bonus, stock
  • Annual Performance Review process
  • Succession Planning and Strategy
  • Retention Strategies
  • Establishment of department accountabilities, including talent acquisition, compensation, training and development, performance management, talent assessment, records management, safety and health, employee relations and retention, and AA/EEO compliance.
  • Complying with federal, state, and local legal requirements by studying existing and new legislation, anticipating legislation, enforcing adherence to requirements, and advising management on needed actions.
  • Periodic reporting on various reports on HR metrics to Executive Team.
  • Enhancement of department and company reputation by accepting ownership for accomplishing new and different requests and exploring opportunities to add value to job accomplishments.
  • Supervise direct staff of 6 in multiple manufacturing locations and total staff of 10

Job Requirements:

 

  • Bachelors’ Degree in Human Resource Management, Business Administration or a related field
  • Prefer Master’s degree or SPHR Certification.
  • Minimum of 10 years of HR or related experience, including a minimum of 5 years’ experience in a leadership role within Human Resources in a manufacturing or similar environment
  • Experience managing safety programs
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7 Keys To A Successful Job Search

 

 

Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

Nancy Collamer Nancy Collamer , Contributor

 

I’m always trying to keep on top of the latest career trends and recently read through the mother lode: The 2012 white paper published by the Career Thought Leaders Consortium. It’s full of useful tips, strategies and ideas for job seekers and I want to share my favorites with you.

 

The report summarizes the key findings of the consortium’s annual Global Career Brainstorming Day, an international, multi-city event that brings together nearly 100 career professionals — including coaches, resumé writers and college career services professionals — from the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. “What’s consistent every year is the very fast pace of change,” says Louise Kursmark, co-director of consortium and one of the co-editors of the report.

 

Here’s what the experts said are seven keys to a successful job search in today’s competitive environment:

 

 

  1. Keep your resumé short and succinct. Despite reports of its impending demise, the experts said a resumé is still very much an essential tool of the job search. But hiring managers (and the computers they use to sort through resumés) are in a rush. So you need to format your resumé to be read quickly and in small bites. These days, a typical resumé is scanned for just six to 10 seconds, often on a mobile device.

 

Eliminate filler words, use numbers to quantify your impressive results (such as “boosted sales 83 percent”) and include relevant keywords that appeared in the job posting.

 

Limit your contact information to just one email address (old-fashioned AOL, no; contemporary Gmail, yes), one phone number and your LinkedIn profile URL.

 

 

 

Residential addresses aren’t needed, although it can be helpful to list your region (for example, New York Tri-State), so the employer knows you’re located near the open position.

 

  1. Create a portfolio of job-search documents. Want a way to distinguish yourself from the crowd of applicants? According to the Career Brainstorming Day pros, many job seekers are supplementing their resumés with collateral leadership briefs, blogs that establish their robust online professional identity and, among senior-level managers, one-page executive summaries.

 

  1. Consider hiring a coach to perfect your video interview skills. More employers are relying on Skype for long-distance and initial screening interviews. As a result, more job seekers are using coaches to help them excel in video presentations.

 

  1. Dive deep into LinkedIn. Over the past few years, using LinkedIn to find work has gone from a good idea to essential. “Having a sharp LinkedIn profile may be even more important than having a great resumé,” Kursmark says.

 

Nonetheless, the experts said, all too many job candidates fail to fully embrace this tool, especially older job seekers. To maximize the use of LinkedIn, engage more frequently with your LinkedIn networks. One of the best ways to do this is to actively participate in LinkedIn’s industry and interest groups.

 

 

Find relevant groups by going to your LinkedIn home page, clicking on the Groups tab and search the “groups you may like” or “groups directory” tabs. Then join a few groups and post links to interesting articles, participate in discussions and share helpful resources. You will become known as a go-to resource and improve the likelihood that you will get noticed by recruiters, referral sources and hiring managers.

 

  1. Use Twitter and other forms of social media to attract the attention of employers who are hiring. According to the white paper, “employers will move from using external recruiters to an internal hiring process that will depend heavily on identifying prospective employees through their online presence and through referrals of existing employees. Personal websites, social media presence, development of subject matter expertise and a well-defined personal brand will be the requirements for gaining the attention of prospective employers.”

 

  1. Limit the amount of time you spend on job boards. As Next Avenue has noted, job boards are one of the least effective ways to get hired. The Career Brainstorming Day experts said it’s generally only worth applying for a position through a job board if your resumé matches 80 to 85 percent of what an employer asks for in a posting.

 

Job seekers continue to be frustrated by computerized Applicant Tracking Systems that scan applicants’ resumés for keywords. “This finding underscores the importance of direct, targeted search with networking as its core component as the most important method for finding a job,” Kursmark says.

 

To maximize your chances for success using job boards, focus on smaller, regional and industry-specific job boards, as well as aggregator sites, like Indeed.com and Simplyhired.com.

 

 

  1. Start your search sooner rather than later.

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Five Job Search Tactics That Don’t Work — And Five That Do

 

 

 

 

Liz Ryan , CONTRIBUTOR

 

Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

 

If you haven’t job-hunted in a while, you might be surprised to see how the talent market operates now. Job-hunting has changed a lot.

 

Between 1995 and 2005, almost all of us learned how to fill out online job applications and then wait to hear back from employers. That is a waste of time these days!

 

If completing online job applications and waiting for responses is your entire job search strategy, you could be job hunting for years.

 

 

You are very unlikely to hear a peep back from employers when you pitch applications or resumes into their automated recruiting portals.

 

Stodgy, robotic resumes are another staple of a nineteen-eighties or -nineties job search that can only hurt a job-seeker now.

 

Here are five job search tactics that haven’t worked for years — and five new-millennium tactics that will help you find a job that deserves your talents.

 

Five Job Search Tactics That Haven’t Worked For Years

 

 

  1. Job fairs.

 

  1. Resume-blast services.

 

  1. Reaching out to strangers on LinkedIn to ask them to refer you into their company.

 

  1. Using the same resume for every job you apply for.

 

  1. Completing online job applications.

 

Job fairs used to be a great way to get hired, but then for some reason employers stopped allowing their recruiters to interview candidates live at the job fair. That makes no sense.

 

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Ten Signs You’re Shooting Too Low In Your Job Search

 

Dear Liz,

 

I’ve been job-hunting since October. Maybe I was naive thinking my job search would be quick and easy. I’ve been in the insurance industry for over twenty years.

 

I’ve been an agent, an office manager and held almost every insurance job there is.

 

I’ve only had one in-person job interview so far. I’ve applied for numerous jobs but in the other cases I either got a phone interview or no interview.

 

They keep telling me I’m overqualified for the jobs I’m applying for. If I’m overqualified doesn’t that make me the perfect candidate, because I can obviously do the job?

 

I thought if I took my target position down a level or two from the last few jobs I’ve held, I would get hired much faster. I’m applying for jobs I performed fifteen years ago and I thought that would do the trick but it’s not working.

Recommended by Forbes

 

I’m sick of job hunting. I would accept anything. I still have my savings and retirement accounts because I’ve been living frugally since October, but I’m tired of job-hunting and I want to be employed as fast as possible. What am I doing wrong?

 

 

Dear Harlan,

 

It sounds like you’re shooting too low in your job search, and that is almost always a show-stopper. Employers don’t want to hire people who could perform the job with one hand tied behind their back.

 

Here are some of the reasons why not:

 

  1. They are afraid you’ll quit for a better job the minute you have the opportunity to do so.

 

  1. They are afraid that even if you say “I’ll take this job, a lower-level role that pays less than I’ve earned since 2004 — no problem!” you won’t be happy. You’ll be antsy. They don’t need that.

 

  1. They want to hire someone they can train their own way.

 

  1. They get spooked by any candidate who seems to know more about the field than they do.

 

There could be an age-discrimination aspect depending on your age, but the key is that you are shooting too low and recruiters can tell that you’re doing so. They don’t want to hire somebody for whom this job is not a natural step along your career path.

 

How can we blame them for that? It’s fear that is making you shoot low in your job search and even though everyone can relate to that fear, the remedy for the fear is not to take any job you can get but to stop and think about what you do best and what you really want to do.

 

You have to do some reflection to figure out where your sweet spot lies — at the intersection of the things you do well, the things you love to do and the needs in the talent marketplace.

 

Your fearful mindset (“I still have my savings, but I’m sick of job-hunting and I want to be employed as fast as possible!”) is killing your job search.

 

People can read energy very well.

 

Fearful energy is not appealing in a senior-level candidate or any candidate. Your need to get hired fast is what’s artificially depressing your job-search altitude and keeping you from having the conversations you should be having with hiring managers in pain.

 

You have breathing room. You have your savings and retirement accounts. Take time to stop and figure out your next step. Give up the idea of getting any job at all. Employers want to hire somebody who is dying to do the job they’re hiring for — not somebody who’s merely willing to do the job because it represents a break from job-hunting.

 

Here are ten signs you’re shooting too low in your job search:

 

  1. Recruiters view your LinkedIn profile and say “Wow! You have lot of heavy-duty experience. Are you sure you’re interested in this much lower-level job?” They are skeptical. Do you think your hiring manager will be any less skeptical? Don’t use your precious mojo trying to talk anybody into interviewing you!

 

  1. When you show up for an interview or get on a call for a phone interview, the interviewer’s voice indicates surprise or puzzlement. They can’t match the person on the phone (you) with the job opening they’re ready to interview you for.

 

  1. Whenever you get a “no thanks” notice, it gushes about your vast experience and skills and closes with “….but we need someone with a background closer to the job spec.”

 

  1. Recruiters always express surprise that you’re willing to work for the salary number you give them. The gap between your expected salary target and your actual salary target is almost always a red flag for recruiters — whether you are asking for more or less money than the position pays.

 

  1. When you tell recruiters you’d be more than delighted to take a step down in your career they sound less than excited to hear it. Naturally they wonder “Why can’t this candidate get a job at their level?”

 

  1. On your job interviews, you answer every question with a precise, expert opinion on the spot. The interviewer is taken aback — maybe even intimidated. Most companies don’t hire people who intimidate their interviewers.

 

  1. You’ve heard at least one hiring manager say “Heck,you could do my job!” and they’re right.

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Five Job Search Moves That Make You Look Like An Amateur

 

Dear Liz,

 

I’m job-hunting. I have a few job possibilities I’m pursuing, but I’m only excited about one of them.

 

The best job opportunity I’ve found is with a company located about ten minutes from my house. It’s not only close to my house but the job is perfect for my background, too.

 

When I first talked to the recruiter on the phone she asked me what I was earning. I wasn’t working then so I said “I’m not working now but I’m looking for a job that pays at least $55,000.”

 

The recruiter said “Okay. I can work with that.”

 

When I interviewed with the employer (Company X) they asked me again “How much are you looking to earn?” I said “At least $55,000” and they said “Fine.”

 

Now I’ve met the hiring manager and several other employees. I have a much better feeling for the job. The recruiter called me last Friday and said “Okay, Company X is putting an offer together for you.

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3 Things You Can’t Control In Your Job Search (And 3 Things You Can!)

 

Several years ago, I interviewed for a job that I really, really wanted: It seemed like the perfect role at a dream organization. I worked hard to prepare for the interview, and though I was nervous on the big day, I felt ready.

 

I was at ease with the interviewers (a team of five!), and felt we developed a strong rapport. I left the office sure I’d made a good impression—only to find out a few days later that they hired someone else.

 

I was devastated and disappointed. But their rejection email emphasized it wasn’t that I was a bad fit, but rather that there was someone who was a better fit.

 

This was a critical lesson for me. When looking for a new position, you want to believe that it’ll be like buying a new computer or booking a trip. In other words, you’ll research all of the options, pick the best and it’ll be yours. The hard reality, however, is that there is so much outside of your control in a job search from what openings are out there, to who else is in the running, to whether your interviewer is having a bad day.

 

So, a much better way to spend your time and energy is to focus on the parts that are within your control. In these areas, greater effort will mean more payoff.

And, for everything outside of your control?

Admitting they’re out of your hands will keep you from taking a loss too personally.

Here’s a guide to what’s what:

 

  1. You Can’t Control Who’s Hiring

Sometimes, the exact position you’re looking for will open up at just the right time; and other times you feel like you’ve been refreshing job boards and checking back in with your contacts again (and again, and again) before you see anything that’s a good fit. Unfortunately, you can’t will a role into being available.

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The new year is on top of us.

You have a decision to make: are you going to keep your job for another year, or strike out for greener pastures in 2018?

 

Now is the perfect time to ask, “Does my job still deserve me?”

Keep in mind that our tendency as human beings is to stick with the tried-and-true and avoid the unfamiliar. Changing jobs is a pain in the neck. It’s easier to stick with the job you already have than to job-hunt, whether your current job is the right job for you or not.

It’s easy to go to sleep on your career, and forget that if you’re not moving ahead you are slipping backwards. It’s easy to start thinking that work is just a place to pick up a paycheck.

Your work is your art. You deserve to work for people who appreciate that fact — and appreciate the spark and brilliance you bring to everything you do.

You have talents you should be recognized and compensated for.

You have dreams and aspirations that only you can bring about. If your current job, your current boss or your current income level are keeping you from realizing your dreams, why stay stuck in place for another year?

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Three Ways You’re Killing Your Job Search Without Even Realizing It

Being in active job search mode often means you feel compelled to do something: post your resume online, apply for as many jobs as you can and network with contacts old and new.

However, there is a wide gap between activity and productivity. When the activity is actually not moving you forward into phone screens, in-person interviews and offers, then it’s time to stop and re-examine your approach.

The reality is that the precise things you think you should be doing are the exact strategies that are killing your search.

Posting your resume all over the internet simply means you are devoting time to an activity with little to no return. Applying for as many jobs as you can means you don’t have focus and smell like desperation. And when your networking is not working, that doesn’t mean you should repeat it, just expand it.

Here’s what smart candidates do to stop spinning their wheels and actually make progress:

Stop being the needle in the haystack.

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QA Manager – Compliance

Location
Cleveland, OH
Salary
$100,000 – $140,000
 
Degree
Bachelor
Date
Aug 24, 2016
 

Job Description

Responsible for supervising the activities of MQA Specialists. Ensures accurate and timely certification of manufacturing batch record documentation. Ensures performance of audits and SOP/GMP compliance at the manufacturing facility. Performs investigations as required to ensure product quality. Performs analysis on quality indicating data and makes recommendations for improvement.

Key Responsibilities

  • Supervises daily activities of MQA Specialists. Assures job objectives are met on a timely basis
  • Updates and procures approval of job descriptions for department personnel.
    Performs and oversees the training of personnel. Effectively hires,
    develops, councils, manages and motivates staff. Writes and administers
    performance appraisals for department personnel.
  • Assures standard operating procedures (SOPs) define the steps necessary to complete tasks. Writes review and updates SOPs.
  • Assures timely execution of batch record certification function. Follow up with
    department management to ensure corrective action is implemented.
  • Supports metrics for the facility. Collects, maintains, trends, and analyzes data.
  • Develops systems to facilitate timely finished product disposition. Perform
    investigations as required. Follows up to ensure corrective action as
    implemented. Initiates/supports management meetings/projects to
    facilitate timely product disposition.
  • Addresses daily quality concerns and questions. Offers recommendations as required. Performs investigations as necessary.
  • Troubleshoots manufacturing problems and quality issues. Works with operations
    personnel to investigate, collect, and analyze data for, resolve and
    implement corrective action. Contacts supplier and/or outside laboratory
    for investigational support.
  • Maintains knowledge of current GMPs and regulatory guidelines.
  • Performs supplemental investigations and determines impact or product disposition

 

Qualifications

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Continuous Improvement Manager 

Job Code  (02380342) 

Location: Clarksville, IN  

Salary: $100,000.00 – $120,000.00

Full Benefits: Yes

Interview Exp: Yes

Relo Exp: Yes

 Industries

AUTOMOTV

  newjob

 

Job Description

 

Company:

Our customer is one of the world’s leading manufacturer of automotive components. This world class firm designs, develops and manufactures a broad range of products for both the OEM and aftermarket segments. This company is offering great compensation, benefits packages and substantial future career growth.

 diversity

 

Continuous Improvement Manager Summary:

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