Three years ago, I decided to ‘take a leap’ of faith: I said goodbye to my career in media and advertising and said hello to a new world of executive recruiting. I celebrated my work anniversary by posting a reflection of my accomplishments over the last few years on Linkedin. My post went viral with over 5.5 million views and now 50,000 people want to know how I did it. Instead I’m going to share it with you.

Most of us have experienced a time in our lives where we are paralyzed by fear, literally standing in our own way, bounded by fear of the unknown, fear of instability, fear of losing. But for me, many life-changing experiences taught me to focus not on the fear, but on what has to be done in the moment — taking things step by step.

My first experience with change was at the age of 5 when my parents separated and I bounced back and forth between two houses. As a teenager, I watched my father go from a fifth-degree black belt martial arts instructor to a man battling Multiple Sclerosis, a disabling disease of the central nervous system, who needed a cane to walk down the street. In college, my family lost our house, our car and soon my dad passed. Life forced me to embrace change.

Three years out of college, I was working as a media strategist for one of the largest advertising and marketing agencies in the world, OmnicomGroup. I was responsible for developing media campaigns for huge companies like Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. My days consisted of doing tasks such as identifying target audiences, brainstorming media stunts, negotiating with vendors and submitting and revising (and revising again) proposals to WB executives.

Anyone who’s worked in an advertisement agency knows that the fast-paced, high-volume, deadline after deadline driven workload can make two years easily feel like double. Tired, but also in forever search of growth, I began opening myself up for new opportunities. I considered moving over to the studio side or working for an online publisher, pitching proposals to media strategists like myself.

After quite a few interviews in the industry, I somehow found myself sitting inside Green Hasson Janks, a top ranked regional public accounting firm, interviewing for an executive recruiting role. Not what I expected! A sales position in the accounting and finance sector, which included business development, understanding accounting/finance functions, providing hiring and career consultation, negotiating fees, salaries and compensation packages – this position was completely out of my wheelhouse.

There I was, facing another huge change — but this one was voluntary. I weighed the pros and cons and did all that I could to make sure I fully thought it through. As much as I wanted to predict the future, I couldn’t. I had to trust that everything would work out, just like it always had. At worst, if I took the position and completely tanked, I could always go back to media planning. I had excellent references and strong relationships with quite a few people still in the industry, which I thought of as a safety net.

I leapt. With work ethic and drive, I was determined to make change work in my favor. Nevertheless, I couldn’t have imagined that after my first year of working as an executive recruiter that I would be nominated for Rookie of the Year and inducted into the President’s Club. Nor could I have ever imagined that I would be promoted to director in my second year.

How did I do it? Media planning prepared me for executive recruiting in ways I didn’t expect. I was accustomed to working long hours, which came in handy as I tried to play catch up, learning a new job and industry. For a long time, I was the first one in my office and the last one to leave. I was also used to multitasking and working on multiple projects. I was able to keep calm when I had multiple searches running simultaneously, and I didn’t let much slip through the cracks. I was comfortable with learning new technology platforms, and I quickly learned the recruiting database tracking system for all of our client/candidate information and activity. By my third month of recruiting, I became the go-to person for all things database and technology related. Simply put, I realized many of my skills were transferable.

Most importantly, I was a “sponge.” I wasn’t afraid to ask for help from my peers and my managing director. I asked lots of questions and made sure that I understood not only what I was doing but also why. I involved myself on projects that weren’t mine to gain the experience. I volunteered to sit in on meetings, screen resumes, send emails and so many other tasks. Additionally, I found a mentor in my managing director. It started by keeping him clued into everything I worked on and by providing him with frequent updates, sometimes multiples a day. Later, we became partners on many searches and learned to leverage each other’s strong suits, which yielded higher productivity and more business.

Last but not least, I gave my new career a fair chance. Within my first year of recruiting, my friends and family would ask me, “So, how do you like it?” My response was always the same, “I haven’t quite decided.” I was careful not to decide too quickly. I have been working since I was 15 and out of all the jobs I’ve had, recruiting had the largest learning curve. There were days I felt lost, and it was difficult for me to measure if I was succeeding. While I was hitting my goal metrics, there were a lot of ups and downs beyond my control. I later learned to ride the wave and recover quickly from disappointment. Most importantly, in my toughest moments, I didn’t submit to any defeating thoughts.

For anyone who relates to my story, here’s my Top 11 list, with a bonus:

1. Don’t let the unknown scare you. Try your best to be adaptable and have a positive attitude towards change – voluntary or involuntary.

2. Ask yourself, “What can I happily see myself doing?” Sometimes, we can be so unhappy in our current situation that the grass easily looks greener on the other side. Be selective and take into consideration your interests and your strengths.

3. Make an honest list of the pros & cons of your current and your prospective careers. Think about what you’re going into as you move forward, and what will you leave behind. And don’t take for granted the little things that can be important, like the office environment, office location, company/industry perks, etc.

4. Take a look at all your career options inside and outside your industry.

5. Get a second opinion from someone who truly knows you. Talk out your options, your concerns and your game plan with someone you trust (friend, family, colleague, mentor).

6. Network – reach out to someone who is doing the job you want. Find out what their day is like, what they enjoy most about their job and what challenges they face.

7. Make sure your next move will put you closer to your end goal.

8. Look for people not just for jobs. Who you are working with is just as important as what you are doing for work.

9. Make a plan and consider a timeline. Is there a particular time of year that would be best to make the switch? Is there a way you can slowly transition from your current career to your new one? Map out your career change.

10. Understand that when you change careers, sometimes that means you’re starting over. Be prepared to put in the extra work and effort to understand your new job and industry. Focus on your strengths and the transferrable skills you can use to help get ahead while you’re in the process of building new ones.

11. Allow yourself time to adjust. Some transitions take longer than others. Be patient and try to avoid jumping to any defeating conclusions.

Bonus: Finally and perhaps most importantly:

VIEW SOURCE:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/break-the-future/2017/04/17/how-to-change-careers-and-kill-it-at-your-new-job/#32aea9eb5ac4

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Dream job: 5 steps to turn your passion into a job

 

 

 

Check out these top dream jobs you never even knew existed.

If you have something you love to do, there are ways to make it your profession.

 

 

 

·      The average American worker puts in 38.7 hours a week and works 46.8 weeks during the year, according to a Pew analysis of Labor Department data. Some workers bypass that number with 40% regularly working more than 50 hours per week, and 20% working more than 60 hours each week.

·      That’s a lot of hours to put in at a job if it’s not your passion. Some people, of course, are lucky enough that what they do for work is what they love. If you’re not one of those people — and you’re someone who counts the hours until you can leave work to get to your hobby — there is hope.

·      In many cases, you can turn your passion into a career. Doing so, however, requires having a plan, being aggressive, and sometimes making sacrifices.

 

 

1. Do a self-evaluation

Just because you love brewing beer on the weekends does not mean you want to turn that into a job. Before starting on a path to turn your passion into a career, you need to evaluate if that’s something you really want.

 

Be honest. In some cases, our hobbies bring us joy because we only get to spend limited time on them. You may love knitting or model trains, but you should really consider whether being part of that activity all day long will take the fun out of it.

 

 

2. Identify what the relevant jobs are

I love books and would happily read for a living if that was an option. Since it’s not, I had to examine what the actual jobs in the field are. In theory, I could work at or manage a bookstore, I could edit for a publisher, or try my hand at being a full-time author.

 

None of those appealed to me all that much, so I ended up as a writer. Call it a book-adjacent field, but by looking at my options, I decided on none of the above and kept my passion for books as a hobby while entering a related field.

 

3. Learn what you need

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Ten Signs You’re Shooting Too Low In Your Job Search

 

Dear Liz,

 

I’ve been job-hunting since October. Maybe I was naive thinking my job search would be quick and easy. I’ve been in the insurance industry for over twenty years.

 

I’ve been an agent, an office manager and held almost every insurance job there is.

 

I’ve only had one in-person job interview so far. I’ve applied for numerous jobs but in the other cases I either got a phone interview or no interview.

 

They keep telling me I’m overqualified for the jobs I’m applying for. If I’m overqualified doesn’t that make me the perfect candidate, because I can obviously do the job?

 

I thought if I took my target position down a level or two from the last few jobs I’ve held, I would get hired much faster. I’m applying for jobs I performed fifteen years ago and I thought that would do the trick but it’s not working.

Recommended by Forbes

 

I’m sick of job hunting. I would accept anything. I still have my savings and retirement accounts because I’ve been living frugally since October, but I’m tired of job-hunting and I want to be employed as fast as possible. What am I doing wrong?

 

 

Dear Harlan,

 

It sounds like you’re shooting too low in your job search, and that is almost always a show-stopper. Employers don’t want to hire people who could perform the job with one hand tied behind their back.

 

Here are some of the reasons why not:

 

  1. They are afraid you’ll quit for a better job the minute you have the opportunity to do so.

 

  1. They are afraid that even if you say “I’ll take this job, a lower-level role that pays less than I’ve earned since 2004 — no problem!” you won’t be happy. You’ll be antsy. They don’t need that.

 

  1. They want to hire someone they can train their own way.

 

  1. They get spooked by any candidate who seems to know more about the field than they do.

 

There could be an age-discrimination aspect depending on your age, but the key is that you are shooting too low and recruiters can tell that you’re doing so. They don’t want to hire somebody for whom this job is not a natural step along your career path.

 

How can we blame them for that? It’s fear that is making you shoot low in your job search and even though everyone can relate to that fear, the remedy for the fear is not to take any job you can get but to stop and think about what you do best and what you really want to do.

 

You have to do some reflection to figure out where your sweet spot lies — at the intersection of the things you do well, the things you love to do and the needs in the talent marketplace.

 

Your fearful mindset (“I still have my savings, but I’m sick of job-hunting and I want to be employed as fast as possible!”) is killing your job search.

 

People can read energy very well.

 

Fearful energy is not appealing in a senior-level candidate or any candidate. Your need to get hired fast is what’s artificially depressing your job-search altitude and keeping you from having the conversations you should be having with hiring managers in pain.

 

You have breathing room. You have your savings and retirement accounts. Take time to stop and figure out your next step. Give up the idea of getting any job at all. Employers want to hire somebody who is dying to do the job they’re hiring for — not somebody who’s merely willing to do the job because it represents a break from job-hunting.

 

Here are ten signs you’re shooting too low in your job search:

 

  1. Recruiters view your LinkedIn profile and say “Wow! You have lot of heavy-duty experience. Are you sure you’re interested in this much lower-level job?” They are skeptical. Do you think your hiring manager will be any less skeptical? Don’t use your precious mojo trying to talk anybody into interviewing you!

 

  1. When you show up for an interview or get on a call for a phone interview, the interviewer’s voice indicates surprise or puzzlement. They can’t match the person on the phone (you) with the job opening they’re ready to interview you for.

 

  1. Whenever you get a “no thanks” notice, it gushes about your vast experience and skills and closes with “….but we need someone with a background closer to the job spec.”

 

  1. Recruiters always express surprise that you’re willing to work for the salary number you give them. The gap between your expected salary target and your actual salary target is almost always a red flag for recruiters — whether you are asking for more or less money than the position pays.

 

  1. When you tell recruiters you’d be more than delighted to take a step down in your career they sound less than excited to hear it. Naturally they wonder “Why can’t this candidate get a job at their level?”

 

  1. On your job interviews, you answer every question with a precise, expert opinion on the spot. The interviewer is taken aback — maybe even intimidated. Most companies don’t hire people who intimidate their interviewers.

 

  1. You’ve heard at least one hiring manager say “Heck,you could do my job!” and they’re right.

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Ten Rules Job Seekers Are Allowed To Break Now

The working world is changing dramatically around us.

 

The job-search world has changed, too.

You can’t be a complacent job seeker these days. You have to be proactive. You can’t follow the old rules:

 

  1. Apply for jobs online, then wait.

 

  1. If you don’t hear anything, apply for more jobs online.

 

  1. Wait as long as it takes for you to hear back, and one day you’ll get a job.

 

Forget that nonsense! You have to break out of that mold to get a good job these days.

 

You might think it’s too risky to break the old, traditional job-search rules. If you don’t break a few rules, you could wait forever to get your new job!

 

For years, department managers have gone around and outside their organizations’ formal recruiting processes to fill their job openings.

 

They use their networks and their employees’ networks as recruiting sources. They meet people at industry events and keep in touch with them, and hire them down the road.

 

You can tap into the same informal networks to get your next job. You can break the old rules and step into your power!

Recommended by Forbes

 

Here are ten rules job-seekers are allowed to break now:

 

  1. The rule that says your resume must be dusty and formulaic.

 

Don’t use meaningless, robotic language like “Results-oriented professional” in your resume. Tell your human-story in your own words, instead!

 

  1. The rule that says you can’t use the word “I” in your resume.

 

You can use “I” in your resume — it’s your principal branding document! You can use “I” in your LinkedIn profile, too.

 

  1. The rule that says the only way to apply for a job is through the company’s online job application portal.

 

Black Hole recruiting portals are the worst job-search channel there is. Use your network, or reach out to hiring managers directly.

 

  1. The rule that says you can’t reach out to your hiring manager directly.

 

Yes you can!

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Millennials, Here’s Why Job Titles Don’t Matter Anymore

I can’t tell you how many times my Dad used to ask me about what exactly it was again that I was doing for a living.

Coming from the “black and white” world of accounting on Wall Street, he wasn’t satisfied with my answer that didn’t fit neatly into a box like lawyer, doctor, or teacher. As the founder of an online community, I was proud of my work and wanted badly to convey to my Dad what I was up to—but he always seemed to respond with a blank stare followed by defeated resignation.

 

 

What I’m finding is that I’m not the only one having this problem. In fact, the majority of the millennials I talk to today are opting for work that’s not clearly defined.

The millennial worker today wears many hats—whether that’s copywriter, marketer, sales strategist, or bookkeeper. We’re adaptive to the shifting demands of a fast-paced work environment and the skills we need to learn are often just a Google search away.

This week on the Unconventional Life Podcast, I interviewed one millennial woman who’s on the leading edge of nontraditional work and thriving.

Meet Tash Price, the business developer and manager of Engine House VFX, an award-winning UK-based 2-D, 3-D, CGI and VFX animation studio who has served clientele like BBC and Sony. Engine House VFX covers a wide range of projects within advertising, gaming, architectural visualization and film. Their work has been featured online, on TV, at events, and in films and games.

“You’ll get into the conversation of what you do for a living and you’ll say animation and people can’t quite seem to grasp it. They’ll quickly move on and they seem confused by it because it’s not the standard job role,” Price says.

But according to Price, the conversation doesn’t have to stop there. Rather than moving on, you can educate others about what you do in a way that promotes connection and redefines what it means to work in the 21st century.

I spoke with a number of other millennials who are finding fulfillment in nontraditional job roles, and here’s what they had to say:

  • Job Titles Don’t Reflect Lifestyle. In the past, jobs were much less integrated than they are today. Going to work meant punching in a time card at on office for a designated number of hours. Today, technology enables millennials to work seamlessly from their devices so that being “on” and “off” the clock is less rigid and more fused with lifestyle.
  • • Eric Termuende, an entrepreneur, speaker, and the author of Rethink Work, says, “With the capabilities of technology increasing so quickly, the ability to work from more places, using more devices, longer hours every day makes the job less about the seemingly limited title, and more about the holistic experience. In many cases, the title doesn’t encompass the life Millennials are living as a result of the job (or jobs) they are doing.”

Price’s animation studio is embodying this new “integrated” work model. ”Instead of having hundreds of people sitting behind a cubicle we have a small core team and we work with lots of freelancers who are based all over the world. It means everyone gets the lifestyle they want and we can hand-pick the artists we want for the job. We’ve got people working in Turkey, Sweden, Iran, the US, the Netherlands, Japan,” she says.

  • Job Titles Act As Constraints. Today’s millennial workers may have bigger ambitions than previous generations. Just a few decades ago, only a marginal percent of American workers held a college degree, and the majority of women preferred to stay at home.

As millennials tackle a host of global issues, both men and women are rising to the occasion with a shift towards businesses that do social justice. 92% of millennials believe businesses should be measured by more than profit. Undra Robinson, a millennial entrepreneur, says “Millennials believe our potential in life is limitless and want to change the world, and job titles only add constraints. They are polar opposites.”

Millennials Aren’t Motivated By Job Titles.

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Senior Software Engineering Director 

Job Code (02444166)

Location:   Austin, TX

Fee: 15%

Salary:       $130,000.00 – $170,000.00

Full Benefits:      Yes

Relo Exp: Yes

Comp Comments: Relocation assistance possible for the ideal candidate.

 

Job Description

We are in need of a Senior Director of Software Engineer for a direct-hire opportunity in Austin, TX.

 

Job Duties

 

·       Provide strong technical leadership to major projects as well as manage teams of engineers.

·       Build and scale infrastructure; construct algorithms and new distributed protocols.

·       Oversee the work of talented, cross-functional teams to strategically plan, design and develop infrastructure solutions to help drive continual growth.

·       Contribute substantively to technical architecture decisions for site projects and lead efforts to build and maintain an extremely large scale software services platform.

·       Recruit and retain top tier engineers, hire and mentor tech leaders, and provide career development and professional growth for talented engineers and managers.

 

 

Required Skills

 

·       Experience with commercial software development.

·       Good understanding of algorithms, data structures, performance optimization techniques, and object-oriented programming.

·       Experience working on advertising systems.

·       Relevant experience in leadership roles within engineering organizations and recruiting senior engineers.

·       Proficiency in Java/J2EE and C/C++/C# technologies.

 

 

Required Qualifications

 

·       Bachelor’s Degree.

·       Candidates need to be Directors, Senior Directors, Exec Directors of SWE or even VPs at smaller companies willing to take a Sr Director title.

·       MUST be eligible to work in the U.S. WITHOUT sponsorship.

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MBB – Operational Excellence Lead 

Job Code  (02453732)

Location:    Greensboro, NC

Salary:        $110,000.00 – $135,000.00

Full Benefits:        Yes

Interview Exp:     Yes

Relo Exp:   Yes

Comp Comments:          15% bonus

 

C06, M23, M61, C12, OPERATE, 6-SIGMA, LEAN-MFG

   blogs_0000_blog_13      

Industries

CHEMICAL, AGRICHEM

 

Job Description

Join a chemical world leader as the Operational Excellence Lead in support of business and operational development, transformation, and improvement initiatives. Participate on the Corporate team as a Six Sigma MBB to strategically initiate and implement Change Management and Operational Excellence.

 

Responsibilities:

 

— Participate as a member of a global Center of Operational Excellence, develop a high proficiency in Operational Excellence methodology and act as an expert in the techniques and approach.

— Build Operational Excellence capability by leading initiatives that use the methodology in high priority company projects and target areas.

— Coach leaders, teams and colleagues to develop their knowledge and capability to use Operational Excellence in their own areas.

— Play an active role in the Operational Excellence community, drive the development of capabilities and improve the Operational Excellence methodology.

 

Qualifications:

 

— Bachelor’s degree, master’s preferred with 10-20 years as MBB with Operational Excellence/ Change Management experience.

— Professional operational excellence: Six Sigma Master Black Belt, Shingo philosophy trained, and Lean & Manufacturing Specialist

— US Citizen or Permanent Resident (green card) required.

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R&D Tax Credits Senior Director

 

 

Location

NYC, NY

Salary

$75,000 – $200,000

blogs_0002_blog_15 

Feb 14, 2017

TOP 50 CPA Firm – NYC/Boston – Salary Commensurate with Experience

 

·        Our client offers unparalleled diversity, continuous challenges, advancement opportunities, and the support necessary for both personal and professional development.

·        Be part of a smaller but growing practice, entrepreneurial & very profitable practice.

·        Outstanding benefits package includes health insurance options, 401K, life insurance coverage, and generous vacation time/paid time off.

·        Note from the Hiring Manager

 

Looking for Seniors (2-3 years’ experience) to Directors (10-12 years’ experience) must come from a dedicated R&D tax role.

 

Position Summary

 

·        Seeking R&D Tax candidates to review and help grow the practice. In this role, you will need excellent communication skills as well as the ability to effectively interact with all levels of firm management and staff, clients and other external business contacts.

 

·        Minimum Education & Experience

·        Bachelor’s degree in Accounting or related field is required.    

·        License in CPA and/or J.D./LL.M. Taxation preferred.

·        Excellent oral and written communication skills with the ability to evaluate and articulate complex information.

·        Strong computer skills and be proficient in Microsoft Office.

 

APPY

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Plant Controller

 

Location

Jackson, TN

Salary

$85,000 – $95,000

 

Date

Feb 14, 2017

Position Summary

money 

The plant controller functions as a business partner with plant and financial management to effectively manage and control the local business. Leads the financial staff at the plant and is accountable for plant-level responsibilities including general accounting, payables, order entry, billing, cost accounting, bill of materials, business analysis, financial reporting, sales management, and computer operations. Will also liaison with corporate financial staff, as required.

 

Essential Functions

·        Prepare monthly reports of results, monthly forecasts, annual operating plan, and strategic planning

·        Responsible for internal controls at the plant for operations, sales and finance.

·        Analyze and accurately report current month’s financial results to the plant, sales, and corporate management in accordance with corporate format and time requirements.

·        Submit all financial transactions, transmissions, and reporting on a timely and accurate basis.

·        Ensure accuracy of the physical inventory and reported results. Investigate and explain book to physical adjustments.

·        Perform audits of bills of materials to ensure product costs are accurate and accounted for properly. Report audit results monthly.

·        Ensure timely and accurate input of bill of material and price code changes.

·        Ensure bill of material and costing accurately reflect production operations.

·        Maintain a perpetual inventory for finished goods and reconcile this perpetual to production, shipping, and returns on a daily basis.

·        Attend daily plant production meetings.

·        Perform daily walkthroughs of the plant with the General Manager to discuss production and costing issues.

·        Review labor reporting and cost, material costs, manufacturing overhead, distribution cost, returns and inventory levels.

·        Conduct formal meetings with manufacturing, finance and sales management personnel to discuss all plant issues. Develop and publish a formal agenda and

·        recap with actions to be taken.

·        Document and understand ERP/MRP systems, hardware, and reporting conventions and serve as the on-site IT expert.

·        Analyze potential excess and obsolete inventory items monthly.

·        Reconcile all inter-company accounts monthly.

·        Analyze internal controls to ensure assets are adequately safeguarded and results are accurately reported.

·        Assure adherence to Generally Accepted Accounting Policies. Resolve questions of GAAP and internal controls with corporate financial management.

·        Assist in the completion of special projects.

·        Preferred Education and Experience

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AUTOSAR Embedded Software Engineer

 

 

Location

Farmington Hills, MI

Salary

$75,000 – $92,000

 

Feb 05, 2017

AUTOSAR Embedded Software Engineer 

 

Description

Our client, a name-brand developer of automotive embedded systems and communication tools, is looking for an Embedded Software Engineer to join their AUTOSAR development team. 

·        In this position, you will work directly with OEM clients to gather requirements, adapt software for new chips and configurations, validate software, and maintain updates.  You’ll be in a high-profile position, working on next generation technology.  Other responsibilities include:

·        Understanding and guiding customers in their use of embedded products as well as supporting customers through all aspects of the product lifecycle (requirement, design, development, validation, and production).

·        Work closely with the customer to further implement and configure AUTOSAR embedded software used in electronic control modules including customer specific software needs.

·        Diagnose, troubleshoot, and support AUTOSAR (MICROSAR) embedded software system (e.g. OS, RTE, BSW modules) as well as application software components.

·        Liaison with customers and silicon vendors throughout the software development process.

·        Meet with customers on a regular basis to develop positive, long-term, relationships.

·        Develop customer training courseware and provide instruction in classroom and workshop environments.

 

·        This is a growing, globally recognized company in the automotive embedded sector.  They pride themselves on their positive work culture, growth opportunities, and engineering-centric focus.

 

 

Qualifications

BSEE/CE and 2+ years of experience in automotive embedded software development.

 

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