Millennials, Here’s Why Job Titles Don’t Matter Anymore

I can’t tell you how many times my Dad used to ask me about what exactly it was again that I was doing for a living.

Coming from the “black and white” world of accounting on Wall Street, he wasn’t satisfied with my answer that didn’t fit neatly into a box like lawyer, doctor, or teacher. As the founder of an online community, I was proud of my work and wanted badly to convey to my Dad what I was up to—but he always seemed to respond with a blank stare followed by defeated resignation.

 

 

What I’m finding is that I’m not the only one having this problem. In fact, the majority of the millennials I talk to today are opting for work that’s not clearly defined.

The millennial worker today wears many hats—whether that’s copywriter, marketer, sales strategist, or bookkeeper. We’re adaptive to the shifting demands of a fast-paced work environment and the skills we need to learn are often just a Google search away.

This week on the Unconventional Life Podcast, I interviewed one millennial woman who’s on the leading edge of nontraditional work and thriving.

Meet Tash Price, the business developer and manager of Engine House VFX, an award-winning UK-based 2-D, 3-D, CGI and VFX animation studio who has served clientele like BBC and Sony. Engine House VFX covers a wide range of projects within advertising, gaming, architectural visualization and film. Their work has been featured online, on TV, at events, and in films and games.

“You’ll get into the conversation of what you do for a living and you’ll say animation and people can’t quite seem to grasp it. They’ll quickly move on and they seem confused by it because it’s not the standard job role,” Price says.

But according to Price, the conversation doesn’t have to stop there. Rather than moving on, you can educate others about what you do in a way that promotes connection and redefines what it means to work in the 21st century.

I spoke with a number of other millennials who are finding fulfillment in nontraditional job roles, and here’s what they had to say:

  • Job Titles Don’t Reflect Lifestyle. In the past, jobs were much less integrated than they are today. Going to work meant punching in a time card at on office for a designated number of hours. Today, technology enables millennials to work seamlessly from their devices so that being “on” and “off” the clock is less rigid and more fused with lifestyle.
  • • Eric Termuende, an entrepreneur, speaker, and the author of Rethink Work, says, “With the capabilities of technology increasing so quickly, the ability to work from more places, using more devices, longer hours every day makes the job less about the seemingly limited title, and more about the holistic experience. In many cases, the title doesn’t encompass the life Millennials are living as a result of the job (or jobs) they are doing.”

Price’s animation studio is embodying this new “integrated” work model. ”Instead of having hundreds of people sitting behind a cubicle we have a small core team and we work with lots of freelancers who are based all over the world. It means everyone gets the lifestyle they want and we can hand-pick the artists we want for the job. We’ve got people working in Turkey, Sweden, Iran, the US, the Netherlands, Japan,” she says.

  • Job Titles Act As Constraints. Today’s millennial workers may have bigger ambitions than previous generations. Just a few decades ago, only a marginal percent of American workers held a college degree, and the majority of women preferred to stay at home.

As millennials tackle a host of global issues, both men and women are rising to the occasion with a shift towards businesses that do social justice. 92% of millennials believe businesses should be measured by more than profit. Undra Robinson, a millennial entrepreneur, says “Millennials believe our potential in life is limitless and want to change the world, and job titles only add constraints. They are polar opposites.”

Millennials Aren’t Motivated By Job Titles.

MORE

Read More


Information Technology (IT) Security Consulting Services Director

Woodland Hills, CA
Salary
$120,000 – $175,000
 newjob
Degree
Bachelor of Science
Date
Oct 03, 2016
Job ID
2408170
Director- Information Technology Security Consulting Services
ITS | Woodland Hills, CA, United States – Prefer candidates currently at Manager or above level with a U. S. based Big-4 or national CPA / Consulting firm. We offer an exceptional career opportunity featuring a very reasonable work life balance, Google HQ style work environment, and an exceptional compensation and benefits package.
Specialized boutique accounting and consulting services firm looking for an Information Technology (IT) Security Consulting Services Director to help double the size of our firm in three years.  As a result, you will have the opportunity to grow your career in a collaborative environment that is a playground for highly skilled, self-motivated professionals.  You will oversee several concurrent project teams to review and assess the IT environments, risks, and controls related to information confidentiality, integrity and availability for companies that range from newly public high growth entities in rapidly changing environments, to the largest entertainment and public companies in Los Angeles. 

 If you’re interested, here is the challenge for your first year:

APPLY

Success

Read More


Could America finally be making progress toward getting more women into the tech industry?

New data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests we might be.

Of the 39,000 jobs created in tech this year, women filled 60 percent of them. Tech career Hub Dice found that this is the first time women have represented a majority of new hires in the past decade.

READ MORE:

Read More


The Best-Paying Jobs for Women

Despite the 50-year anniversary of the Equal Pay Act this year, women continue to earn less than men across most job functions. In fact, according to new numbers released in February, the gender wage gap widened by slightly more than a percentage point in 2012—back to levels last seen in 2005. Across the economy, women now earn 81 cents for every dollar earned by men. Meanwhile, economists say wage growth has stagnated for all workers in the last decade, and particularly so for women. The hourly pay of young, female college graduates dropped 8.5% between 2000 and 2011, compared to 1.6% for men.

So which are the jobs that pay women the most?

READ MORE:

Read More