Millennials, Here’s Why Job Titles Don’t Matter Anymore

I can’t tell you how many times my Dad used to ask me about what exactly it was again that I was doing for a living.

Coming from the “black and white” world of accounting on Wall Street, he wasn’t satisfied with my answer that didn’t fit neatly into a box like lawyer, doctor, or teacher. As the founder of an online community, I was proud of my work and wanted badly to convey to my Dad what I was up to—but he always seemed to respond with a blank stare followed by defeated resignation.

 

 

What I’m finding is that I’m not the only one having this problem. In fact, the majority of the millennials I talk to today are opting for work that’s not clearly defined.

The millennial worker today wears many hats—whether that’s copywriter, marketer, sales strategist, or bookkeeper. We’re adaptive to the shifting demands of a fast-paced work environment and the skills we need to learn are often just a Google search away.

This week on the Unconventional Life Podcast, I interviewed one millennial woman who’s on the leading edge of nontraditional work and thriving.

Meet Tash Price, the business developer and manager of Engine House VFX, an award-winning UK-based 2-D, 3-D, CGI and VFX animation studio who has served clientele like BBC and Sony. Engine House VFX covers a wide range of projects within advertising, gaming, architectural visualization and film. Their work has been featured online, on TV, at events, and in films and games.

“You’ll get into the conversation of what you do for a living and you’ll say animation and people can’t quite seem to grasp it. They’ll quickly move on and they seem confused by it because it’s not the standard job role,” Price says.

But according to Price, the conversation doesn’t have to stop there. Rather than moving on, you can educate others about what you do in a way that promotes connection and redefines what it means to work in the 21st century.

I spoke with a number of other millennials who are finding fulfillment in nontraditional job roles, and here’s what they had to say:

  • Job Titles Don’t Reflect Lifestyle. In the past, jobs were much less integrated than they are today. Going to work meant punching in a time card at on office for a designated number of hours. Today, technology enables millennials to work seamlessly from their devices so that being “on” and “off” the clock is less rigid and more fused with lifestyle.
  • • Eric Termuende, an entrepreneur, speaker, and the author of Rethink Work, says, “With the capabilities of technology increasing so quickly, the ability to work from more places, using more devices, longer hours every day makes the job less about the seemingly limited title, and more about the holistic experience. In many cases, the title doesn’t encompass the life Millennials are living as a result of the job (or jobs) they are doing.”

Price’s animation studio is embodying this new “integrated” work model. ”Instead of having hundreds of people sitting behind a cubicle we have a small core team and we work with lots of freelancers who are based all over the world. It means everyone gets the lifestyle they want and we can hand-pick the artists we want for the job. We’ve got people working in Turkey, Sweden, Iran, the US, the Netherlands, Japan,” she says.

  • Job Titles Act As Constraints. Today’s millennial workers may have bigger ambitions than previous generations. Just a few decades ago, only a marginal percent of American workers held a college degree, and the majority of women preferred to stay at home.

As millennials tackle a host of global issues, both men and women are rising to the occasion with a shift towards businesses that do social justice. 92% of millennials believe businesses should be measured by more than profit. Undra Robinson, a millennial entrepreneur, says “Millennials believe our potential in life is limitless and want to change the world, and job titles only add constraints. They are polar opposites.”

Millennials Aren’t Motivated By Job Titles.

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4 ways to get a raise for 2018

 

Aside from higher pay, most of the top 5 appear to have average amounts of stress and a fairly average work-life balance.

There’s nothing like a pay increase to ring in the new year. Here’s how to score one.

 


Hoping for a raise going into 2018? You’re not alone.

Most of us could use more money, whether it’s to pay the bills, save for a specific milestone, or have a little extra breathing room for emergencies.

The good news is that most large companies plan to give out raises for 2018, according to consulting firm Willis Towers Watson. Furthermore, the average increase will be somewhere in the ballpark of 3%, which, if you’re earning $60,000 at present, will put another $1,800 in your pocket next year, minus taxes.

Still, just because many employers will be dishing out pay increases doesn’t mean you’re guaranteed to get one. If you want to improve your chances of seeing a larger paycheck in 2018, here are a few key moves to make this month.

  1. Volunteer for something big

Whether you volunteer to drive a new marketing campaign or do that research report nobody wants to do, going above and beyond toward the end of the year is a good way to secure a raise for 2018. After all, if the fact that you’re stepping up is fresh in your boss’s mind, he or she is more likely to consider giving you a pay increase.

 

What if there’s no major assignment to jump on? It’s simple — invent your own. Come up with a proposal for an initiative that will better the business, and offer to be the one to spearhead it. This will show your boss that you’re thinking big and aren’t afraid to take on new challenges, which will hopefully work to your advantage moneywise.

  1. Get a major assignment done ahead of schedule

If you want to prove that you’re worthy of a raise, you’ll need to do a good job of delivering on the tasks you’re responsible for. But if you really want to increase your chances, don’t just aim to meet deadlines. Rather, get your assignments done well in advance, so much so that your boss can’t help but take notice. This especially holds true for major projects that others are depending on.

 

  1. Do your research

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