Convert Internships into Careers


5 ways to turn a temp job into a permanent one

 

Didn’t get that full-time offer? Take a temp job instead. It could become permanent if you do things right.

If you’ve been hired for a temporary role, you should know that you’re in good company. Over a given year, nearly 15 million temporary and contract workers are hired across the U.S.

The problem, of course, is that being a temp worker often means losing out on key benefits such as health insurance, paid time off, and job security. The good news? If you approach things strategically, you can turn a temporary job into a permanent role. Here’s how.

  1. Come in with a great attitude

You’ll find that a lot of people who get hired as temps make it clear to their employers that they’re not particularly happy to be there. After all, it’s hard to stay motivated when you’re only looking at a few months’ worth of employment at best. On the other hand, if you start off your temp gig with a positive attitude and manage to maintain it throughout, you’ll send the message that you’re the type of person who can roll with the punches, and who’s willing to make an effort even when the upside isn’t great or guaranteed. And that could lead a manager to hire you when a role becomes available, or fight to turn yours into a permanent one.

 

  1. Network within your company

It’s said that networking is perhaps the most important factor in landing a job, and that applies to situations where you’re already working, albeit not permanently. If you really want to increase your chances of getting hired full-time, make a point of mingling with other teams and getting to know key players at your company. This way, you’ll have more people saying good things about you when you see about permanent employment.

 

  1. Explore different areas of the business

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How to pay for school when you make a career change

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A bad day at work can make anyone dream about switching jobs. But if those scattered thoughts form into a plan to change careers, you might need to dust off your book bag and head back to school.

 

Hitting the books in your 30s, 40s or 50s requires money at an age when retirement savings and mortgage payments may be top of mind. You can get financial aid as an adult learner, but to keep your spending in check, you’ll have to think strategically.

 

Make sure your investment is worth it

 

Before you jump back into caffeine-fueled study sessions, research salary and employment trends in your chosen field — especially if you want to make more money. That’s a realistic goal: Half of adults surveyed who successfully changed careers after age 45 said their income increased, according to a 2015 American Institute for Economic Research report.

 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook can help you find in-demand occupations and their average earnings. Physical therapist assistants, for instance, need an associate’s degree, and demand for them is projected to grow 41% by 2024. The median pay in 2015 was $55,170.

 

Once you’ve settled on an occupation, consider getting your credentials through a part-time program at a community college or state university.

 

“If the program you’re in makes it impossible to keep your current job full time,

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