Convert Internships into Careers


Dream job: 5 steps to turn your passion into a job

 

 

 

Check out these top dream jobs you never even knew existed.

If you have something you love to do, there are ways to make it your profession.

 

 

 

·      The average American worker puts in 38.7 hours a week and works 46.8 weeks during the year, according to a Pew analysis of Labor Department data. Some workers bypass that number with 40% regularly working more than 50 hours per week, and 20% working more than 60 hours each week.

·      That’s a lot of hours to put in at a job if it’s not your passion. Some people, of course, are lucky enough that what they do for work is what they love. If you’re not one of those people — and you’re someone who counts the hours until you can leave work to get to your hobby — there is hope.

·      In many cases, you can turn your passion into a career. Doing so, however, requires having a plan, being aggressive, and sometimes making sacrifices.

 

 

1. Do a self-evaluation

Just because you love brewing beer on the weekends does not mean you want to turn that into a job. Before starting on a path to turn your passion into a career, you need to evaluate if that’s something you really want.

 

Be honest. In some cases, our hobbies bring us joy because we only get to spend limited time on them. You may love knitting or model trains, but you should really consider whether being part of that activity all day long will take the fun out of it.

 

 

2. Identify what the relevant jobs are

I love books and would happily read for a living if that was an option. Since it’s not, I had to examine what the actual jobs in the field are. In theory, I could work at or manage a bookstore, I could edit for a publisher, or try my hand at being a full-time author.

 

None of those appealed to me all that much, so I ended up as a writer. Call it a book-adjacent field, but by looking at my options, I decided on none of the above and kept my passion for books as a hobby while entering a related field.

 

3. Learn what you need

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10 Best Jobs for Millennials

Meghan McCallum has an enviable commute. The 30-year-old starts her morning with a leisurely cup of coffee at home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, then takes a few steps to the office set up in her spare bedroom. There, she pores over emails from clients in France and Quebec before diving into her work translating documents from French into English.

 

 

Meghan McCallum, 30, is self-employed as a French-to-English translator. She appreciates that her job allows her flexibility in both work hours and location. (COURTESY OF MEGHAN MCCALLUM)

 

As a self-employed translator, McCallum enjoys the flexibility that comes with her career, which requires only an internet connection, the right software and a love of the written word.

 

“It’s so far from the traditional 9-to-5,” she says. “I feel more of a work-life balance now that I’m working for myself.”

 

She’s not alone in valuing that freedom.

Millennials rank work-life balance second only to salary when it comes to making career decisions, according to the U.S. News 2017 Best Jobs for Millennials rankings, which identifies the jobs that best match the priorities of today’s young professionals. Web developer, dental hygienist and software developer top the list.

 

 

Also included are professions that often offer workers the ability to set their own schedules: interpreter/translator, insurance sales agent and massage therapist.

 

The results make sense to careers experts, who have observed that, in the workplace, millennials crave flexibility, learning opportunities, teamwork and projects that contribute to the greater good.

 

“In these careers, you have that opportunity to really become an expert in a less siloed way,” says Jenn DeWall, a career coach who works with millennials. “They dovetail meaning and connection.”

 

 

Measuring Priorities

 

Millennials now make up the largest segment of the U.S. workforce. As they flood the job market, these workers, ages 20 to 34, often look for job opportunities that provide benefits different from the ones their predecessors sought.

 

Some young professionals are even “willing to forgo money- and title-related promotions to maintain that lifestyle balance that feels comfortable for them,” says Dan Ryan, principal at Ryan Search and Consulting, a firm that helps businesses recruit and train employees.

 

To determine what career characteristics matter most to millennials, U.S. News sent a survey asking people ages 20 to 34 to rank nine job traits.

 

Not surprisingly, salary topped the list for the more than 1,000 respondents. After all, this is a generation saddled with student loan debt: 68 percent of the people who graduated college in 2015 had student loans, at an average amount of $30,100, according to the Project on Student Debt at The Institute for College Access & Success.

 

But respondents also prioritized work-life balance and low stress levels, suggesting they’re looking for jobs that allow them to maintain their preferred way of life. That’s true for McCallum.

 

 

“I’m the kind of person who will buckle down and work as much as I need to to get things done, but I feel free to work around personal events,” she says. “I feel really passionate about both. It’s important to stick to your own interests and hobbies.”

 

To identify the top 10 jobs for millennials, U.S. News used the results of its survey on top job traits to weight data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (2015) and the U.S. News Best Jobs rankings. The new list reflects the priorities of salary, work-life balance and low stress level, and takes into account the percentage of people ages 20 through 34 who work in the field as well as the degree to which each job offers upward mobility to young professionals. None of the jobs requires more than a bachelor’s degree.

 

 

Top 10 Jobs for Millennials

 

  1. Web Developer

 

Median salary: $64,970

 

Work-life balance: high

 

Stress level: below average

 

Some millennials are native to the digital era, having never experienced life before email and the internet. Their tech savvy makes the job of web developer a natural fit for many of them. The career demands technical skills, such as computer coding and an understanding of web traffic analytics. It also requires an artistic sensibility and graphic design knowledge, since the internet is a highly visual medium. Strong communication skills help web developers translate client demands into a functional, attractive finished product. Web developers may work as independent contractors or as employees at corporations or other organizations. Web developers often are able to work remotely – a benefit that appeals to many millennials.

 

  1. Dental Hygienist

 

Median salary: $72,330

 

Work-life balance: high

 

Stress level: average

 

When you head to the dentist’s office, you likely spend the majority of your appointment with a dental hygienist. These health care professionals clean teeth, take mouth X-rays and provide preventive services such as screening for cavities and oral cancers. They educate patients about proper brushing and flossing techniques and suggest products to use. Dental hygienists should be good communicators able to engage with all kinds of personalities, and they must pay close attention to detail, since they are responsible for keeping track of dental records. About half of dental hygienists work part time, which may suit the flexible lifestyle some millennials are seeking.

 

  1. Software Developer

 

Median salary: $98,260

 

Work-life balance: above average

 

Stress level: average

 

Many of the conveniences of modern life – and the entertaining applications that run on smartphones – stem from the innovations software developers create. They may design custom programs for clients or fix bugs in extant software. This career demands computer coding prowess, attention to detail, creativity and the ability to solve problems. It often involves teamwork and sometimes remote work, both of which may be attractive to millennials. Some software developers have become successful technology entrepreneurs, a possibility that holds allure for many young coders hoping to launch the next Snapchat.

 

  1. Computer Systems Analyst

 

Median salary: $85,800

 

Work-life balance: average

 

Stress level: average

 

The essential responsibilities of computer systems analysts are understanding clients’ business needs and how technology can meet them. They also help install new and upgraded digital systems and train other employees how to use them. These information science specialists must be able to analyze problems, devise solutions and communicate with both business managers and technology workers. They also often develop expertise in a particular topic, such as health care or finance. Computer systems analysts can work directly for companies or as consultants who take on projects for different clients.

 

 

 

  1. Mechanical Engineer

 

Median salary: $83,590

 

Work-life balance: above average

 

Stress level: average

 

Mechanical engineers design, build and test tools and machines. In their jobs at manufacturing companies and engineering firms, they need to be good at math, problem-solving and mechanics. Creativity helps them imagine solutions to complex problems, while strong communication skills and the ability to work in teams allow them to collaborate on projects. Millennials who like to see tangible results from their labor may enjoy working as mechanical engineers. It may also appeal to those who like to work with innovative technology, such as 3-D printers.

 

 

  1. Interpreter and Translator

 

Median salary: $44,190

 

Work-life balance: high

 

Stress level: average

 

Communication is key for translators, who convey written information from one language to another. Interpreters do the same with spoken language. These careers require fluency in at least two languages, plus strong reading and writing or listening and speaking skills. The work interpreters and translators do can vary day by day, which makes for many opportunities to learn. About 20 percent of people who do these jobs are self-employed, which affords them the flexibility many millennials crave. Others work for agencies, or in courtrooms, schools and hospitals.

 

  1. Radiation Therapist

 

Median salary: $80,220

 

Work-life balance: above average

 

Stress level: below average

 

Providing medical care to cancer patients in their most vulnerable moments is the specialty of radiation therapists. They use CAT scans and X-rays to determine precisely where to target radiation treatment, administer radiation doses and keep detailed records of their work. Radiation therapists work closely with doctors and nurses to carry out treatment plans, and they communicate with clients and their families. They need to be able to operate machinery and have the empathy to listen to and work with people suffering from cancer. Millennials hoping to make a direct difference in people’s lives may be drawn to this career.

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5 ways to turn a temp job into a permanent one

 

Didn’t get that full-time offer? Take a temp job instead. It could become permanent if you do things right.

If you’ve been hired for a temporary role, you should know that you’re in good company. Over a given year, nearly 15 million temporary and contract workers are hired across the U.S.

The problem, of course, is that being a temp worker often means losing out on key benefits such as health insurance, paid time off, and job security. The good news? If you approach things strategically, you can turn a temporary job into a permanent role. Here’s how.

  1. Come in with a great attitude

You’ll find that a lot of people who get hired as temps make it clear to their employers that they’re not particularly happy to be there. After all, it’s hard to stay motivated when you’re only looking at a few months’ worth of employment at best. On the other hand, if you start off your temp gig with a positive attitude and manage to maintain it throughout, you’ll send the message that you’re the type of person who can roll with the punches, and who’s willing to make an effort even when the upside isn’t great or guaranteed. And that could lead a manager to hire you when a role becomes available, or fight to turn yours into a permanent one.

 

  1. Network within your company

It’s said that networking is perhaps the most important factor in landing a job, and that applies to situations where you’re already working, albeit not permanently. If you really want to increase your chances of getting hired full-time, make a point of mingling with other teams and getting to know key players at your company. This way, you’ll have more people saying good things about you when you see about permanent employment.

 

  1. Explore different areas of the business

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How to pay for school when you make a career change

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A bad day at work can make anyone dream about switching jobs. But if those scattered thoughts form into a plan to change careers, you might need to dust off your book bag and head back to school.

 

Hitting the books in your 30s, 40s or 50s requires money at an age when retirement savings and mortgage payments may be top of mind. You can get financial aid as an adult learner, but to keep your spending in check, you’ll have to think strategically.

 

Make sure your investment is worth it

 

Before you jump back into caffeine-fueled study sessions, research salary and employment trends in your chosen field — especially if you want to make more money. That’s a realistic goal: Half of adults surveyed who successfully changed careers after age 45 said their income increased, according to a 2015 American Institute for Economic Research report.

 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook can help you find in-demand occupations and their average earnings. Physical therapist assistants, for instance, need an associate’s degree, and demand for them is projected to grow 41% by 2024. The median pay in 2015 was $55,170.

 

Once you’ve settled on an occupation, consider getting your credentials through a part-time program at a community college or state university.

 

“If the program you’re in makes it impossible to keep your current job full time,

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